Where is Hospice Care Provided

Where is Hospice Care Provided


Last Updated on June 19, 2024 by Frank Davis

Hospice care is a program that helps people who are dying from a terminal or degenerative illness. Hospice care provides comfort for the patient and support for the family in the home, hospice center, nursing home, or other facilities. Hospice care is usually provided when curative treatments have been exhausted and patients have less than six months to live.

Where Is Hospice Care Provided?

The majority of hospices provide care out of facilities in residential neighborhoods–either a patient’s own residence or one they visit on a daily basis. In addition to providing comfort for the patient, the care provided is tailored to the needs of the dying patient. Some hospices are located within or near medical centers, so patients may receive the best possible care.

Regardless of where it is provided, the patient gets an individualized plan that focuses on his or her end-of-life needs. Some hospices allow family members to continue to live in the home, with assistance for tasks like bathing and dressing. Other hospices provide shorter stays in residential facilities. Hospice programs generally offer patients personalized care including phone calls, not only from their doctors but also from family members; informal counseling; and pastoral services, which provide spiritual support. All caregivers must be trained to provide compassionate services at the end of life.

What Is the Cost of Hospice Care?

Hospice care may be provided at no cost to patients, or it may have a sliding fee scale based on income. The cost may be covered by Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance, or a combination of sources.

When is Hospice Care Provided?

So far as is known, hospice care is provided only to patients expected to die within six months. Physicians must certify that the patient has a terminal illness and has less than six months to live. The certification is usually provided by the attending physician and/or hospice medical directors.

What Training and Certification Are Required to Provide Hospice Care?

As in home health care, all hospice workers must be qualified and certified in order to provide care. There are a number of hospice accreditation organizations that certify programs, including the American Association for Hospice and Palliative Care (AAHPC), the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), and the Community Oncology Alliance. In addition, there are certifying boards of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.

How Does the Patient Access Hospice Care?

Patients must receive a referral to a hospice program by their physician. The program then reviews the patient’s medical situation, including his or her diagnosis and prognosis, to evaluate whether he or she is eligible for hospice services. Qualifying patients are given an individual treatment plan that takes into account their entire family situation. The treatment plan often includes suggestions for better care in the home.

What Are the Benefits of Hospice Care?

Hospice care provides a number of advantages to patients and their families. Patients receive advice and counseling, including emotional support; services such as nursing and social work; and spiritual support, including bereavement counseling to help with the grieving process. Many hospice organizations provide volunteers who assist in activities like shopping or pet care. The goal is to provide quality care and support to patients and their families. Hospices also can help find appropriate community resources for family members.

Hospice care is a program that helps people who are dying from a terminal or degenerative illness. The program provides comfort for the patient and support for the family in the home, hospice center, nursing home, or other facility. Hospice care is usually provided when curative treatments have been exhausted and patients have less than six months to live.

A physician must certify that the patient has a terminal illness and has less than six months to live, which usually occurs when there are no medical options available other than hospice care. Most hospices provide comfort for patients and their families while respecting their religious traditions.

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